Bonebridge

January 2014 - It's a big month for Bonebridge. We're performing at the Winter Jazz Fest 2014 on January 11 at midnight. Then, on the 18th we begin a 2-week European tour. Come by and check out the new music if you're close..

  Erik Friedlander, cello; Trevor Dunn, bass; Michael Sarin, drums; Doug Wamble, guitar

Erik Friedlander, cello; Trevor Dunn, bass; Michael Sarin, drums; Doug Wamble, guitar

Erik Friedlander, cello; Trevor Dunn, bass;  Michael Sarin, drums; Doug Wamble, slide-guitar

"It’s an Americana at once familiar, yet unlike anything heard before, as the musician coaxes his cello into the aural shape of banjos and finger-picked guitars:  a truly astounding set." -- Jo-Ann Green, All Music Guide

“The cellist has a knack for creating catchy ditties, and this riff tune picks up extra points because its attendant interplay and pithy soloing makes it richer than it needs to be. Win win, baby.“ --Jim Macnie

“Mr. Friedlander, an ingenious cellist who makes an art of soulful rusticity,“ says Nate Chinen of the NYTimes

Bonebridge is cellist Erik Friedlander's new band and it turns to the American South for inspiration. Taking a cue from his teenage passion for The Allman Brothers Band and Johnny Winter, Friedlander brought in slide-guitar player and Memphis native Doug Wamble to share the front line of this new quartet. The music, which blends Southern rock with Erik's New York edge,  is inspired by the chemistry between the cello and the slide guitar--the two instruments are kindred spirits when played in this fresh new context. Wamble joins a honed unit as Friedlander, Michael Sarin (drums) and Trevor Dunn (bass) have played together in New York City for years, most recently in the Broken Arm Trio.  

  New CD - April/2014

New CD - April/2014

n May of 2013 the Bonebridge Band went into the studio to record and new CD which will be released in 2014. The new cd will be entitled, "Nighthawks"

In September of 2012 New York City, and much of the Eastern USA, was hit by Hurricane Sandy.  It quickly became quite serious. Downtown where I live we got off easy as we were plunged into darkness and without power for 5 days, whereas many in the area lost their houses or were flooded and ruined. I quickly adapted to life following the sun: up early and when the sun set, I’d light a few candles and try to do more work, and then bleary-eyed head to sleep.  My neighborhood was eerie and dark as there were no streetlights, traffic signals or any stores and restaurants open. About every 10 or 15 minutes or so a police car would make an appearance, boldly driving through the black with emergency lights spinning but no siren.  It was in this odd environment of quiet and suspense that I began work on Nighthawks.